Three Styles that Will Ensure You’re Doomed as an Executive!

Growing a business requires developing your people! Without them, you are doomed to fail as an executive! To be successful and effective, you must be able to elicit the best in others and focus on what’s important.

Three styles that will doom your effectiveness:

  1. Failure to motivate. While you cannot motivate others that are unwilling to move forward in their careers, you still have the responsibility to offer them opportunities. Laser-like coaching can make a positive impact. Remember, you’re responsible for each team member’s success. When you believe in each person — even when they don’t believe in him- or herself — unprecedented results can occur.
  2. Assess blame. While you are busy finding fault with others, they are busy doing the same! Taking responsibility trumps blame every time! Hold yourself and others accountable for results, as a team. Remember, straight talk, not what you believe others want to hear, is the key to moving forward together.
  3. Micromanage the team. When you become a cog in the wheel of progress, mischief happens. The wheel breaks down. Focus on the results and trust your people to get their jobs done well. Spot check by asking the right questions to ensure systems are being followed and updated when necessary. While it’s important to keep your eyes on the goal, having a well-trained team that takes focus action is also critical for success.

By developing your ability to effectively manage and motivate others, you and your employees will flourish and thrive.

©Jeannette L. Seibly, 2015

Need to transform your management practices? Contact me before it’s too late! http://SeibCo.com/contact

Jeannette Seibly is an internationally recognized business advisor. For the past 23 years, she has helped thousands of people work smarter, enjoy financial freedom, and realize their dreams now.  She has an uncanny ability to help her clients identify roadblocks, and help them focus to quickly produce unprecedented results.  Each client brings their own unique challenges, and her gift is helping each one create their success in their own unique way. Along the way, with her commitment, she helped create three millionaires.

Are you listening to the criticism?

It always feels good to get compliments, have others think highly of your interactions with clients, or be lauded for the goals you’ve accomplished. In fact, most of us expect to hear that everything is great and wonderful—even when it’s not.  Unfortunately, unadulterated praise rarely provides you with the inside information you need to advance in your career. Every success has its learning opportunities, such as overcoming poor communication habits, correcting ineffective project management skills, adjusting biased attitudes towards others, and becoming more resourceful.

Climbing the corporate ladder requires being open to hearing what you don’t want to hear from co-workers, bosses, and clients. It’s important to learn from your mistakes and learn how to manage perceptions by seeing yourself from others’ point of view. Instead of thinking people are being super critical or are unaware of what you had to do to achieve results.  Failure to welcome the truth can stymie your upward mobility.

The truth is you can’t change what you don’t acknowledge! 

Successful leaders listen instead of defending themselves. They seek out constructive criticism and learn from others’ perspectives about what is working and what needs to be improved. In addition, they rely on the expertise of an executive coach, a trusted advisor who can help them develop their natural strengths and overcome their inherent weaknesses. http://SeibCo.com

When we listen to criticism, we can hear the gold. When we respond appropriately, we improve our leadership.

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2014

Have you had a bad review?

A bad review doesn’t mean your job or career is over. However, it’s a warning something needs to change and change quickly. Your opinions or feelings about the review won’t save your job or change your boss’s decision! Chances are good that you’ll take whatever issue you’re confronting (bad boss, poor company practices, poor performance or attitude, etc.) to your next job due to your attitude about authority, how companies should structure their businesses, or not having found your career niche.

Before actively renewing your resume or increasing your interview readiness, take time to review what you have achieved. (http://TimeToBrag.com) Share your successes with your boss, and put them in writing so he or she can attach them to your performance review. Also, be sure you have your past and current metrics available and include them with your review if they have been favorable. Next, work with your boss to put together two or three “must-dos” to help you improve your performance. Hire an executive or business coach to help you navigate the list and ensure that you are making the right decisions along the way. (http://SeibCo.com/contact) Finally, schedule weekly meetings with your boss to assess progress, tweak the process, and address any new issues that arise.

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013

Successful Leadership Is Evolutionary

Every generation of leaders likes to believe they invented the newest and most effective way to manage people, build profitable companies, and “build a better mousetrap.”  The reality? We didn’t do it ourselves. The achievements of our businesses, inventions, and other ideas were an outcome of working effectively with and through others to achieve the intended results, and at the same time acknowledging our predecessors.

True leaders are humble and take great care of their teams. They set aside their egos, hubris, and other personality impediments to pave forward the pathway and open new doors to achieve their intended results. If they’ve made a lot of money, it is shared appropriately. If they created a lot of press, they generously include others’ contributions in their brag statements. (http://TimeToBrag.com)

Why are these insights important?

1.       When you understand that your success stands on the shoulders of your mentors, business advisors, bosses, and team members, you become humble knowing you didn’t go it alone. It makes it easier for others to want to work with you and share their knowledge and experiences, since it’s not all about you and your credentials or paycheck.

2.       It’s never solely your ideas or creativity that make the system or product work. Sharing the credit works wonders for current and future undertakings. Asking the right questions, listening and building upon ideas, and making available (or creating) the required resources are key traits of leaders. They ensure others stick with you during the design, launch, and refinement processes of your projects.

3.       Documentation of your process, including charts and graphs, helps others visually understand the progress. They can then see potential glitches and possible solutions, and not rely on any overly optimistic feelings of triumph you might have. Documentation also provides a foundation for you, and them, to build on for the next venture.

Remember, leadership and business, as most things in life, are evolutionary—they build on previous successes and learn from past failures to create the next victory.

©Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013

Are you ready for an executive coach?

  • Is it a challenge to get projects accomplished with and through others?
  • Do you vow to find a job that doesn’t require working with anyone?
  • Do you and your boss butt heads with the end result based on who has the strongest willpower?

If you answered yes to any of the above questions, you need an executive coach immediately. There is still time to achieve your 2013 goals, if you are willing to do so. Urgency is the key! Bad habits can be easily redirected if caught early enough. A qualified coach can help you do what you don’t want to do so you can achieve positive results. Don’t wait! Your job may depend upon it!

A good executive coach:

  • Provides on-the-spot insight and options
  • Helps you overcome your blind spots
  • Provides constructive feedback and appropriate praise
  • Asks the right questions to help you develop the right course of action
  • Provides options for how-to work with and through others

 Contact Jeannette today @ http://SeibCo.com/contact

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013

Emotional hiring can be dangerous!

Many executives are good decision-makers or they wouldn’t have the title. However, many are so busy that they fail to listen during interviews unless the candidate says the right things. Then their impulsiveness and impatience kicks in and they hire people that “feel like the right ones”! Hiring based on intuitive powers may sound great, but in reality it is an excuse for not using a strategic hiring system.  

Anytime you hire someone who doesn’t fit all the necessary job requirements but has the likeability factor, you’re doomed for failure. Frequent job-seekers—people with backgrounds to hide and manipulative types—have honed their interview skills well! They know what to say and how to sell themselves to get a job. They know how to be likeable.

Infuse objectivity early in the hiring process. (http://wp.me/p2POui-nj ) This will significantly reduce the possibility of interviewing these types of job candidates and falling into the emotional hiring trap. Use a structured interview process, qualified assessments, and due diligence. Call those references! (Learn how to hire the right person. Get your copy of Hire Amazing Employees, Second Edition. It could save your own job!  http://BizSavvyHire.com)

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013

Is your ethical compass spinning?

When ethical issues get overlooked during the design and implementation of a project, everyone blames somebody else. It’s very easy to succumb to the strongest advocate’s point of view that ethical issues won’t matter. But the problems created by lies or by dismissing the truth won’t resolve themselves. As the leader, you need to guide your team on how to proceed. Make it easy for your employees and peers to bring these types of concerns to your attention—discovering ethical issues down the road usually makes them more costly, if not impossible, to fix. Don’t shoot the messenger! Don’t blame the informer for someone else’s theft or violation of company policy. Is your ethical compass still spinning? Now is the time to call a highly experienced business advisor, someone who can confidentially bring clarity on how to resolve ethical issues. Remember, ethical doesn’t always mean easy!  http://SeibCo.com/contact

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013

Apologies can save your career.

Most of us believe we are blameless for our expressions and actions. Many leaders reinforce poor interpersonal practices and fail to address the aftermath of any damage done. In our busy-ness we are often not present in conversations because we are thinking of other things we need to do or formulating rebuttals. By the time we open our mouths, out pops something critical or negative. Feelings our hurt, reputations disparaged and career options become limited, depending upon the recipient of our remarks.

The problem is twofold. First, we take it personally when others express themselves frankly with similar actions or words. Second, we expect others to get over the things we say or do at their expense, including when we violate an agreement. Sadly, we are so adamant about our right to be right that we tend to swat people with their extended olive branch when they let us know they are concerned or upset.

Being aware before you say something inappropriate and not saying it works best. When that fails, apologizing can quickly can save a brilliant career. When you have offended someone, stop and review your deed from their perspective. Saying “I apologize,” “I’m so sorry,” “Please forgive me,” or “It was not my intention to … ” can build a healthy bridge toward healing relationships, building trust and loyalty, creating effective work teams, and soliciting better ideas. As the boss or leader, your attitude and behaviors carry a lot of weight—use them appropriately.

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013

Apologizing can seem difficult … what do you do to make it easier for you?

New executives are wrongly focused.

Recently I was talking with an executive who was having a difficult time working with another executive inside his company. When I said, “Sounds like she’s in denial,” he responded, “She’s in denial about a lot of things.” Many times new executives are focused on the wrong things. Either the company did not take time to effectively onboard them, or the new hire wasn’t listening and had his or her own agenda.  Making changes and taking unfocused action steps without buy-in from the executive team and employees can get anyone into immediate trouble. The higher up you are on the organizational ladder, the fewer places there are to hide out—the responsibility and accountability solely rests on you.  If you’re one of these struggling leaders, immediately find yourself a mentor and business advisor. It’s important that you quickly rectify bad decisions with guided expertise and correct the old methodology of your work habits.

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013

The key role of any executive

The key role of any executive is to be an effective decision-maker and help steer the company forward profitably and productively. Unfortunately, we are often swayed by office politics, our personal biases, and lack of good objective information. Take time to learn how and when to ask the right business questions. Be strategic in your thinking so you are aware of how your decisions can impact others in doing their jobs, integrating with your current systems, and keeping your internal and external clients satisfied.

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013