Is Impatience Hurting Your Results?










Remember the fable, the tortoise and the hare? The hare, due to his impatience and cockiness, failed to do what needed to be done to win the race. The tortoise won — slow and steady made it happen.

You, like many business executives, want to move forward faster to capture new business and other opportunities. Often overlooked are the required systems, people and practices that allow you to grow and be competitive. When you become impatient, you have a tendency to make poor decisions. Poor planning, if any, and overlooked details will negatively impact your bottom line, business relationships and reputation. Other issues that arise: You burn out. Deadlines are missed. People do not fit their jobs. Customers or potential clients are dissed. The importance of following-up and following- through on promises are marginalized.

How do you build a faster moving company?

Build a strong foundation. It won’t happen overnight. While opportunities in this fast-paced global market can happen quickly, taking them on when you don’t have the capacity to do so can actually hurt you more than help your business grow.

Set aside your impatience.

Take time to develop good relationships with your employees, management team and Board. Steadiness allows your team to utilize their experiences and create win-win strategic and tactical outcomes – it provides the opportunity for everyone to get on the same page with you. Build on what you and your team do well. Utilize a business advisor and executive coach to keep you focused on the right things, and doing them the right way.

©Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013-2015

Jeannette Seibly is a business advisor for business owners and executives of $5MM to $30MM enterprises creating million dollar results, and along the way created 3 millionaires. Contact her at for a free consultation of how to achieve amazing results.

Innovation frauds

Many professionals make changes for the sake of making changes. Some hope change will be recognized as a good thing and keep them employed. The bottom line? Change can be disruptive to any business when modifications are made without a specific goal others can agree upon. Remind new hires to learn the current way your company conducts business before offering any recommendations for changes, at least for 30 days. Just because it worked with their former employer or is considered the industry norm does not mean a change will produce the required results in your environment. Teach everyone how to ask the right questions of their teammates and brainstorm possible adjustments before making any agreed-upon changes. For a new system to work profitably, it must include everyone’s input into its design and alignment.

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013

What do you do when your boss keeps making the same mistakes?

This can happen for a variety of reasons. One is that bosses don’t recognize their errors—they miscalculate the impact of their decisions because they are focused on the big picture and overlook the details, or vice versa. Or, they rely upon their financial, technical, and system interests while failing to include the human aspects required for a successful outcome. When bosses are clueless about their oversights and fail to ask the right questions, they normally blame others for not providing the whole picture. Don’t be passive. Become effective in recommending solutions. Take time to research and provide two or three alternatives, along with details for the execution of each proposed solution. Present these ideas both from a factual and a human perspective by introducing information that is the boss’s primary interest first, and then share the other important pros and cons.

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013

What process do you use to effectively work with your boss?

Are your hiring practices sane?

Recent research data revealed by Google’s head of HR, Laszlo Bock, showed that brainteaser interview questions, unstructured interviews, student GPAs or test scores, and conducting more than four interviews all had little or no predictive value for success of job candidates! ( Designing a simple yet predictive hiring system means thinking through your approach from the both sides of the desk: the applicant’s and the hiring manager’s. Infuse objectivity early in your process ( and use qualified assessments with high predictive values to help determine job fit. For other ideas, get your copy of “Hire Amazing Employees.” (

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013



Impatience stymies the best of plans.

Many gung-ho executives and entrepreneurs have one thing in common: They can be in denial about how fast they can achieve their vision or idea. Although failure is not an option for these dynamic leaders, their impatience stymies the best of plans.  While being confident and persistent are important, so is the ability to work with and through others to make the plan a reality. Emotions, office politics, wanting to be the best at the expense of others, or being focused on a personal million-dollar payout will cloud logic, ethics, good business practices, and common sense. Impatience diminishes the effectiveness of your team! Learn how to tame your impatience and use perseverance and dedication effectively to propel your team forward.

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013

Drama keeps you focused …

… on the wrong things!  We create these distractions or ongoing noise to keep us from doing what we say we want to do, and we allow these circumstances to stymie us.  It’s safer to stay comfortable. We know what to expect. Taking that leap of faith can be scary—but the inherent benefits are that the effort builds confidence, competence, and clarity. Hire a business advisor or executive coach, and be prepared to soar.

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013

How has “drama” kept you from doing what you needed to do?

Apologies can save your career.

Most of us believe we are blameless for our expressions and actions. Many leaders reinforce poor interpersonal practices and fail to address the aftermath of any damage done. In our busy-ness we are often not present in conversations because we are thinking of other things we need to do or formulating rebuttals. By the time we open our mouths, out pops something critical or negative. Feelings our hurt, reputations disparaged and career options become limited, depending upon the recipient of our remarks.

The problem is twofold. First, we take it personally when others express themselves frankly with similar actions or words. Second, we expect others to get over the things we say or do at their expense, including when we violate an agreement. Sadly, we are so adamant about our right to be right that we tend to swat people with their extended olive branch when they let us know they are concerned or upset.

Being aware before you say something inappropriate and not saying it works best. When that fails, apologizing can quickly can save a brilliant career. When you have offended someone, stop and review your deed from their perspective. Saying “I apologize,” “I’m so sorry,” “Please forgive me,” or “It was not my intention to … ” can build a healthy bridge toward healing relationships, building trust and loyalty, creating effective work teams, and soliciting better ideas. As the boss or leader, your attitude and behaviors carry a lot of weight—use them appropriately.

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013

Apologizing can seem difficult … what do you do to make it easier for you?

Do you sound like a four-year-old?

“I don’t want to and I shouldn’t have to.” Many professionals take new positions that include tasks they don’t enjoy and are unwilling to do because the new job offers a better paycheck, job title, or other perks. Yet every role has those hated obligations that you need to get done right in order to keep your job. A childish reaction of “I shouldn’t have to do it” is never a good attitude, and doesn’t bode well for future opportunities either.  

One client wanted a new job and got it. He took on a job his new co-workers refused to do. He met with each client and asked the tough question “What can we do to improve?” It transformed his ability to deal with controversy and build teams to resolve issues, and it positioned him for a big new job—running his own company.

Instead of focusing on what you don’t want to do, adjust your attitude and focus on the results. One solution is to focus on resolving customer dilemmas (both internal and external). Or, focus on system improvements you can create with your team by learning the procedures from start to finish. By developing the right inner talk and correct actions, though you may not love your assignments, you’ll get them done well—the sign of a leader with a high social intelligence. This can-do attitude will be recognized when it is time for performance reviews, pay increases, bonus payouts, and promotion opportunities. (Don’t forget to learn how to share these achievements in a business-savvy manner!

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013

Are you running away from your employer?

When you leave a job, company, or department, are you running away from coworkers or bosses you don’t like or respect? Or are you moving forward toward a goal? Many times people make job and career transitions for more money, but they are not any happier. Or, they switch jobs to find a better boss, only to find the new bosses have issues too.  Or, they falsely believed bigger is better. Remember, the grass isn’t necessarily greener at another company—it simply looks different from the outside looking in, but there will be similar problems. Take time to clarify your goals and life needs: it will make a difference in selecting the right employer for you. (

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013

Being righteous is a career saboteur.

Leaders may win the battle but lose the war with their need to be right. Relying on a management style of browbeating employees or being condescending to clients is a lonely fight. Disheartened employees will find a way to invalidate your directives, and your clients will find another resource.  As a leader, it’s your job to learn how to listen to others’ ideas, even if they don’t appear to have merit, and build upon them for solutions. Being righteous is a career saboteur! Creating win-win outcomes is one of your most important jobs.

Where have you won the battle but lost the war in your career?

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013