SeibCo Now Offers the Market’s Newest Selection Assessment Tool, PXT Select™

Jeannette Seibly, principal of SeibCo, LLC, recently added the innovative new selection assessment PXT Select™ tool to her business offerings, and completed its certification process. Jeannette Seibly, principal of SeibCo, LLC, recently added the innovative new selection assessment PXT Select™ tool to her business offerings, and completed its certification process.




SeibCo now offers the market’s newest selection assessment tool, PXT Select™

New tool provides insights into candidates’ cognitive abilities, behavioral traits and interests for smarter hiring

DENVER–June 26, 2017—Jeannette Seibly, principal of SeibCo, LLC, recently added the innovative new selection assessment PXT Select™ tool to her business offerings, and completed its certification process. The new hiring assessment tool empowers organizations to navigate the competitive talent landscape with confidence and ease.

“We are proud to partner with SeibCo to bring this new assessment tool to market,” says Scott Allison, Vice President and Director at Wiley. “Our partners are trusted advisors to their clients and have a powerful impact on organizations. Great organizations know that success begins with hiring the right people. By working with PXT Select and SeibCo, organizations of all sizes and industries experience greater insight and confidence in their hiring process.”

Too many organizations make crucial hiring decisions based solely on impressions rather than data. Powered by the latest advancements in assessment technology, PXT Select provides the hiring manager with insight into a candidate’s cognitive abilities, behavioral traits, and interests, including tips about the candidate’s potential job fit and relevant job-specific interview questions.

“People are like icebergs: they only let you see what they want you to see,” explains Seibly. “What you don’t see is more significant than what you do see! As a result, the PXT Select answers the ‘why’ many business owners, executives and managers have about their employees and their business results. When businesses hire and promote the right people, they improve their staff, profitability, and performance results.

“For example, a company recently hired a sales manager who had a great resume, interviewed well and seemed to be a team player,” Seibly continues. “After a few months, the company realized he preferred to work alone, wasn’t concerned about the progress of others, and was slow and inaccurate with figures. The company could have known these things about him by using PXT Select in the hiring process.”

About PXT Select

PXT Select makes the very human decisions about hiring simpler and smarter. Combining over 20 years of research with powerful assessment technology, PXT Select and its intuitive suite of reports helps fill the gap between the resume and the interview. This powerful selection assessment provides organizations with actionable, objective data about candidates and employees in a simple to understand format that help them to interview better and hire smarter. PXT Select is available exclusively through the PXT Select Authorized Partner network. Learn more at OR

About SeibCo

Seibly has been an award-winning, internationally recognized business advisor and executive coach for over 24 years, and is designated as a PXT Select™ Certified Professional. Along the way, she has guided the creation of three millionaires and helped over 25 companies produce million-dollar results. Seibly’s publishing credits include: Hire Amazing Employees and It’s Time to Brag! Business Edition. Contact her at or 303-660-6388.

Is our hiring process reactive?

Today many recruiters and hiring managers simply react when someone quits, retires, or gets fired. We post an ad, interview, and hope we’ve hired the right person.  Usually, hiring mistakes result when we focus too much on the person who left and let our biases lead us astray. We tend to look for someone who is similar or dissimilar to the person we’re replacing, and we fail to base our decisions on objective data.

To make matter worse, as creatures of habit we rely on the same old processes. They’re easy to fall back on when we don’t take the time to strategically assess where we are today and what we need to do to be successful tomorrow.

To become proactive, we need to infuse objectivity into the selection process upfront, before the interview process begins. The better-quality information we obtain from qualified tools, the better our hiring decisions.  Such objectivity requires a new mindset, a mindfulness of what we are doing and why.  For more on this subject, see my article Easily Infuse Objectivity Early in Your Hiring System. (

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2014

Hiring biases cost you money.

Today, many recruiters are complaining about not finding qualified candidates. Yet candidates with the credentials and required experience never hear back after applying for opportunities. Or, if they are interviewed, they’re told they are overqualified, don’t have a particular skill set, or don’t have the right pedigree (e.g., industry experience, professional titles, salary history, etc.).

Age does matter. Although the EEO and other agencies frown upon age discrimination, we all know it happens all too often. Recruiters are simply following edicts from their bosses to find someone younger and cheaper. They don’t know how to “sell” a qualified candidate to these bosses. Bosses and recruiters don’t believe they have the time to strategically assess what is truly needed and are unwilling to think outside the box to find the gold. Statistically, younger employees are more job-mobile and will leave a position when more qualified ones will not. More-experienced employees have been through the instability every company experiences and have learned to roll up their sleeves and wait it out.

Here’s a newsflash: Amateurs don’t save companies money! A well-qualified professional who fits the job, regardless of age, can normally do it faster, more thoroughly, and with better quality than someone without experience. The failure by hiring managers to objectively assess for job fit by using qualified assessments can hinder your company’s ability to select the right employees. The truth is poor job fit will create short-term employees or employees who simply do enough to get by and keep their paychecks but no more. It’s a costly status quo with a limited return on investment, because it keeps your company focus in a reactive mode, not on proactive growth.

Filter and invest. Infuse objective data into the process upfront, before the interview, because quality information will make for better decisions. Interviews are inherently biased and can filter out well-qualified candidates because of bias factors (e.g., age, weight, tattoos, gray hair, bald, etc.). Example: If you’re looking for a trainer and have candidates who have done training, talk with them. Use a qualified assessment to determine if they have an interest in presenting the subject matter required. What training and skill development will they need over time? Will they be comfortable in small or large groups? Can they write training content or do they rely on off-the-shelf programs? What will be the best return on investment for the company in the long run? What other skills are currently missing in the company that they can provide?

Remember, using qualified assessments can make a huge difference in vetting the right people, regardless of experience. Hiring qualified people, regardless of age and other biases, and investing in them builds a stronger company faster.

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013

Promote the best, not the ones you like the best.

Too often we use a “halo effect “when promoting employees into leadership roles or coveted opportunities. These people looks like the right ones because we like them or they’ve done something extraordinary recently. Unfortunately, they may not have the thinking style, core behaviors, or occupational interests to get the job done in their new positions. To approach promotion more objectively, first, understand the competencies required of the job. Second, use qualified assessments to discern candidates’ inherent strengths and weaknesses. Third, promote based upon merit, not likeability. Always use the same strategic hiring system for both internal promotions and external hires. To learn how to create a strategic hiring system that works, get your copy of Hire Amazing Employees, Second Edition,

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013

Culture is the fall guy

Why do so many executives fail in new jobs? While many blame company culture, I would suggest that culture is the scapegoat. Poor cultural fit simply amplifies or points out what the C-suite or board members on the hiring committee failed to uncover during the vetting or onboarding process!

Instead of blaming culture, management teams should take the time to think through and write out a strategic hiring process that works, and design it to ensure that each party explores and investigates the other. They should use qualified systems and tools, trust the process, and follow it. Remember, more conversations will be required when hiring an executive to ensure consistency of philosophy and provide deeper exploration of issues and potential solutions. If you follow a well-designed system and use it in the spirit in which it was intended, you will know that you’ve done your best to ensure a positive partnership—even though there are never any guarantees. Excerpt from Companies and Executives Need to Vet and Onboard Each Other!   

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013

Are Your Company’s Values Meaningful?

Everyone brings their own set of personal values into a company, whether it’s when to pay bills, if and when to respect authority or follow rules, or even what’s an acceptable time to arrive at work or an event. Some employees’ values will naturally fit into your organization’s culture, while other employees won’t align with your written business practices and unwritten business expectations. (Qualified core value assessments can reduce selection errors so you hire the right people with values that match your organization. [ ])

The purpose of having a written set of company values is to get everyone on the same page in order to create a workable structure for open communication, clarity of expectations and ethics, respect, trust, and so on. For values to have a positive influence, all employees and managers within an organization need to feel free to voice their concerns and learn how to interact without fear of retribution. Creating meaningful workplace values contributes to reducing turnover, increasing sustainable profits, and building a positive business reputation, since everyone is working from the same set of company principles.

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013

Emotional hiring can be dangerous!

Many executives are good decision-makers or they wouldn’t have the title. However, many are so busy that they fail to listen during interviews unless the candidate says the right things. Then their impulsiveness and impatience kicks in and they hire people that “feel like the right ones”! Hiring based on intuitive powers may sound great, but in reality it is an excuse for not using a strategic hiring system.  

Anytime you hire someone who doesn’t fit all the necessary job requirements but has the likeability factor, you’re doomed for failure. Frequent job-seekers—people with backgrounds to hide and manipulative types—have honed their interview skills well! They know what to say and how to sell themselves to get a job. They know how to be likeable.

Infuse objectivity early in the hiring process. ( ) This will significantly reduce the possibility of interviewing these types of job candidates and falling into the emotional hiring trap. Use a structured interview process, qualified assessments, and due diligence. Call those references! (Learn how to hire the right person. Get your copy of Hire Amazing Employees, Second Edition. It could save your own job!

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013

Are your hiring practices sane?

Recent research data revealed by Google’s head of HR, Laszlo Bock, showed that brainteaser interview questions, unstructured interviews, student GPAs or test scores, and conducting more than four interviews all had little or no predictive value for success of job candidates! ( Designing a simple yet predictive hiring system means thinking through your approach from the both sides of the desk: the applicant’s and the hiring manager’s. Infuse objectivity early in your process ( and use qualified assessments with high predictive values to help determine job fit. For other ideas, get your copy of “Hire Amazing Employees.” (

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013



GPAs are not good success predictors

Many companies today rely on applicants’ GPAs from high school or college as an objective indicator to predict their success on the job. Unfortunately, knowledge does not mean you know how to use information effectively in a business setting. There are street-smart individuals with lower GPAs who will trump those with book smarts in achieving the intended results. Why? Many street-smart people know how to work with and through others to solicit the 90 percent of information not found in books or on the Internet. Using qualified assessments can objectively help you determine if a person’s thinking style will fit the job you need to have done. (

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013

Do you hold your hiring managers accountable?

Very few companies manage their hiring processes by holding their hiring managers accountable. Instead, they experience high levels of turnover and increased difficulty finding qualified candidates because managers reliance on gut reactions or play the blame game.  Neither will resolve systems or bias issues when new employees fail. What would happen if instead your hiring manager’s compensation was tied to employee turnover and performance? A bad manager would either step aside or improve in order to create an environment for employee success. ( (Bad Managers eGuide)) They would improve their use of qualified hiring tools to ensure the best objective information is being utilized and reviewed to ensure laser-like coaching for employee success. (

(c)Jeannette L. Seibly, 2013